Searching for "MARPLE BRIDGE"

We could not match "MARPLE BRIDGE" in our simplified list of the main towns and villages, or as a postcode. There are several other ways of finding places within Vision of Britain, so read on for detailed advice and 8 possible matches we have found for you:

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  • If you are looking for a place-name, it needs to be the name of a town or village, or possibly a district within a town. We do not know about individual streets or buildings, unless they give their names to a larger area (though you might try our collections of Historical Gazetteers and British travel writing). Do not include the name of a county, region or nation with the place-name: if we know of more than one place in Britain with the same name, you get to choose the right one from a list or map:



  • You have just searched a list of the main towns, villages and localities of Britain which we have kept as simple as possible. It is based on a much more detailed list of legally defined administrative units: counties, districts, parishes, wapentakes and so on. This is the real heart of our system, and you may be better off directly searching it. There are no units called "MARPLE BRIDGE" (excluding any that have already been grouped into the places you have already searched), but administrative unit searches can be narrowed by area and type, and broadened using wild cards and "sound-alike" matching:



  • If you are looking for hills, rivers, castles ... or pretty much anything other than the "places" where people live and lived, you need to look in our collection of Historical Gazetteers. This contains the complete text of three gazetteers published in the late 19th century — over 90,000 entries. Although there are no descriptive gazetteer entries for placenames exactly matching your search term (other than those already linked to "places"), the following entries mention "MARPLE BRIDGE":
    Place name County Entry Source
    CHESHIRE Cheshire Bridge-water, the Grand Trunk, the Ellesmere, the Chester and Nantwich, and the Macclesfield and Peak Forest canals also intersect it; and highways exist to the aggregate of nearly 2, 500 miles. The county contains 91 parishes, parts of 5 other parishes, and 4 extra-parochial places; is divided into the hundreds of Broxton, Bucklow, Eddisbury, Macclesfield, Nantwich, Northwich, and Wirrall, with the boroughs of Chester, Congleton, Macclesfield, and the most of Stockport; and it was divided, in 1832 into North and South, in 1867 into North, Mid, and South, for parliamentary representation. The registration county excludes a township Imperial
    CHESTER Cheshire bridge is light and handsome. The race-course, on low ground at the base of the city wall, is 1,800 yards in circuit. A public park of 26 acres, at a cost of £70, 000, was presented to the city by the Marquis of Westminster in 1868; and a statue of the Marquis, at a cost of at least £5, 000, was to be erected by the people at its chief entrance. An equestrian statue of Viscount Combermere was erected at the principal entrance of the castle in 1865. Other public erections are the music hall Imperial
    LUDWORTH Derbyshire Roman Catholic one stands at Marple-Bridge, and was recently erected at the expense of Lord E. G. F. Howard. Imperial
    MACCLESFIELD Cheshire Marple railway, adjacent to the Macclesfield canal, near Macclesfield forest, 4¼ miles N by E of the fork of railway from Manchester into the Churnet Valley and North Staffordshire lines, and 11¾ S by E of Stockport. It dates from ancient times. The Kind, Pepper, and Stally Roman roads met near it. The manor was part of the royal demesne of the Earls of Mercia; was the seat of their courts for the ancient hundred of Hamestan; belonged, at Domesday, to Earl Edwin; was then included in the earldom of Chester; and passed, at the abolition of that Imperial
    MANCHESTER, SHEFFIELD, AND LINCOLNSHIRE RAILWAY Derbyshire
    Lancashire
    Lincolnshire
    Bridge, the Marple, New Mills, and Hayfield Junction, the Cheshire Midland, the Garston and Liverpool, the Stockport, Timperley, and Altrincham Imperial
    Marple Cheshire Marple Bridge ; 1 Bank; has cottonworks; John Bradshaw (1602-1659), who presided at the trial of Charles I., was a native Bartholomew
    MELLOR Derbyshire Marple-Bridge r. station, and 6 E by S of Stockport; and has a post office under Stockport. The township Imperial
    STOCKPORT Cheshire bridges also bestride the river; and another, at a cost of £2,000, was built in 1865; while a high-level one, six-arched, at a cost of about £6,000, on a new and direct line from the r. station to the market place, was founded in 1866. A magnificent viaduct, 1,780 feet long, with 22 semicircular arches, constructed at a cost of about £75,000, takes the railway across. The town hall serves as a court-house, and includes a lock-up. The public rooms were built in 1862, at a cost of about Imperial
    It may also be worth using "sound-alike" and wildcard searching to find names similar to your search term:



  • Place-names also appear in our collection of British travel writing. If the place-name you are interested in appears in our simplified list of "places", the search you have just done should lead you to mentions by travellers. However, many other places are mentioned, including places outside Britain and weird mis-spellings. You can search for them in the Travel Writing section of this site.


  • If you know where you are interested in, but don't know the place-name, go to our historical mapping, and zoom in on the area you are interested in. Click on the "Information" icon, and your mouse pointer should change into a question mark: click again on the location you are interested in. This will take you to a page for that location, with links to both administrative units, modern and historical, which cover it, and to places which were nearby. For example, if you know where an ancestor lived, Vision of Britain can tell you the parish and Registration District it was in, helping you locate your ancestor's birth, marriage or death.