Place:


Faversham  Kent

 

In 1887, John Bartholomew's Gazetteer of the British Isles described Faversham like this:

Faversham.-- mun. bor., market town, and par., river-port, and corporate member of the Cinque Port of Dover, E. Kent, on Faversham Creek (a branch of the Swale), 8 miles NW. of Canterbury and 52 miles SE. of London--par., 2292 ac., pop. 9484; town, 538 ac., pop. 8743; bor. and corporate member, 536 ac., pop. ...


8616; P.O., T.O., 2 Banks, 1 newspaper.Market-days, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday. Faversham is a very ancient place; its name occurs in 812. In 1147 King Stephen and Queen Maud founded at Faversham a Cluniac abbey, within the walls of which they were buried. Faversham Creek is navigable up to the town for vessels of 200 tons. The imports are timber and coal; the exports are hops and agricultural produce. (For shipping statistics, see Appendix.) Faversham has mfrs. of bricks and cement, and in the vicinity are large powder-mills; but the principal industry is the oyster fishery.

Faversham through time

Faversham is now part of Swale district. Click here for graphs and data of how Swale has changed over two centuries. For statistics about Faversham itself, go to Units and Statistics.

How to reference this page:

GB Historical GIS / University of Portsmouth, History of Faversham, in Swale and Kent | Map and description, A Vision of Britain through Time.

URL: http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/1058

Date accessed: 23rd August 2017


Not where you were looking for?

Click here for more detailed advice on finding places within A Vision of Britain through Time , and maybe some references to other places called " Faversham ".