Place:


Harrington  Cumberland

 

In 1870-72, John Marius Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales described Harrington like this:

HARRINGTON, a small seaport town, a parish, and a sub-district in Whitehaven district, Cumberland. The town stands on Bellaport harbour, and on the Whitehaven Junction railway, 2¾ miles S of Workington; is of modern origin, and a sub-port to Whitehaven; carries on a considerable trade, chiefly as a focus of export for extensive neighbouring mines; has a ship-building yard and a ropery, and formerly had chemical works; and has a station on the railway, and a post-office‡ under Carlisle. ...


The harbour has a pier and a fixed light; the latter 44 feet high, visible at the distance of 11 miles, and put up in 1797. The parish comprises 2,338 acres of land, and 452 of water. Real property, £5,497; of which £86 are in ironworks. Pop. in 1851,2,169; in 1861,1,788. Houses, 426. The decrease of pop. was occasioned by the discontinuance of the chemical works, and by diminution of coal-working. The living is a rectory in the diocese of Carlisle. Value, £250.* Patron, E. S. Curwen, Esq. The church is a neat edifice, with a tower; and there are chapels for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists.—The sub-district contains five parishes, three townships of another parish, and an extra-parochial tract. Acres, 51,089. Pop., 6. 765. Houses, 1,384.

Harrington through time

Harrington is now part of Allerdale district. Click here for graphs and data of how Allerdale has changed over two centuries. For statistics about Harrington itself, go to Units and Statistics.

How to reference this page:

GB Historical GIS / University of Portsmouth, History of Harrington, in Allerdale and Cumberland | Map and description, A Vision of Britain through Time.

URL: http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/place/811

Date accessed: 19th June 2019


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